Home>Publications

State Immigration Administration

Monday,Jun 11, 2018

 

The book sets the context for the creation of China’s SIA. In recent years, countries around the world are increasingly recognizing the importance of attracting top talent for national development. According to a new UN report, in 2015, 244 million people were living and working outside their native countries, around 3.3% of the world’s population. Flows of people have become an important component of globalization, a trend that is set to continue in future.

Section one of the book outlines the functions of the SIA and driving factors and trends for international migration. Section two gives an overview of immigration management in the US, Canada, UK, Germany, Australia, Singapore and Japan, drawing comparisons and highlighting lessons for China’s system. Section three elaborates on current trends, policy issues and the economic role of immigration in China, analyzing key challenges and solutions to overcome these issues regarding legislation, administrative innovations, and supporting policies.

 

Table of Contents


 

 

Preface

Chapter 1 The Surge in International Migration

1, What is International Migration?

2, What Explains International Migration?

3, The New Dynamics of Global Migration Flows

4, Challenges and Opportunities International Migration Presents to the World

5, Conclusion: To Strengthen the Capacity of International Migration Management and Service

Chapter 2 The International Experience of Immigration Management

1, What is Immigration Management?

2, How Developed Economies Manage International Migration

3, Conclusion: Valuable Experiences of Immigration Management from the Developed Economies

Chapter 3 The Evolution of International Migration in China

1, Current Situation of International Immigration in China

2, Role of International Immigrants in China’s Development

3, International Immigration Trends in China

4, Conclusion: China Needs to Build a Globally-Competent National Immigration Administration

Chapter 4 The Basis for Building China’s National Immigration Administration

1, Breakthroughs in Laws, Regulations, and Policies

2, Allocation of Migration Management Functions Across Agencies Ministries

3, Gradual Refinement of the International Migration Management System

4, International Migration Management Procedure

5, Conclusion: Establishing a National Immigration Administration will Significantly

Improve China’s Migration Management Capacity and Facilitate Integration with the International System

Chapter 5 Challenges and Opportunities in Building a National Immigration Administration

1, Demands and Opportunities

2, Difficulties and Challenges

3, Conclusion: Establishing a National Immigration Administration Signifies an Opening for China

Chapter 6 How to Build China’s National Immigration Administration

1, Management and Service Functions of the National Immigration Administration

2, The Immigration Law: Legal Base of the National Immigration Administration’s Management and Services

3, Constructing a Framework for the National Immigration Administration

4, How to Elevate the Quality of International Migration Management Services

5, How to Build an Admission Mechanism for International Immigrants

6, How to Optimize China’s Regulations on Permanent Residence

7, How to Optimize China’s Visa System

8, How to Improve the International Migration Management Capacity

9, Conclusion: The National Immigration Administration Has a Long Way to Go

Epilogue

References

Afterword

 

 

 

 

  • China widens its Silk Road to the world

    China’s new ‘Silk Road’ initiative is the only large-scale, multilateral development project that the 21st century has seen so far. There is no counter-offer from the West.

  • Wang Yiwei: Make One Belt One Road America’s Initiative, too

    It is not only because those concepts are exotic to Chinese people, more importantly, ‘silk road’ often referred to ties between Asia and Europe and the concept of ‘maritime silk road’ is not popular. Yet ‘one belt one road’ refers both to continental and maritime silk road.

  • China opens its job market to foreign postgraduates

    In China, there is a big debate going on about the real economy and the virtual economy. Some say the real economy is shrinking because of the expansion of the digital economy, and even ask for more supervision of online operations by the government; those in the virtual economy argue that the lack of innovation and reform is what’s hurting the real economy. China’s Primer Li Keqiang has said, these economies need to be combined to promote the economic development in China, but high costs in the real economy remain an issue. Finding the way to get the balance right is an ongoing challenge.

  • Looking for a house away from home

    As more young people head abroad to study, the demand for student accommodation is growing rapidly.

  • Cheng Shuaihua: 3 things the G20 can do to save the WTO

    The US’ withdrawal from the WTO would be an act of immense self-harm. Without WTO membership, US exports would no longer enjoy most-favoured nation tariffs from over 100 trading partners with which the US does not have a free trade agreement (FTAs).