Home>Top Issues

Transiting in Beijing? You can now stay visa-free for six days

Tuesday,Jan 02, 2018

From: South China Morning Post

 

Visitors from 53 nations who stop in China while in transit to a third country will be able to stay for up to six days in the capital, Tianjin and Hebei province

China is to allow some foreigners to visit Beijing and neighbouring Tianjin and Hebei province for up to six days without a visa.

The visa-waiver scheme is open to visitors from 53 countries who stop in China while in transit to a third country, the state-run People’s Daily reported.

A similar six-day visa-free transit policy was introduced in Shanghai and neighbouring Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces last year.

The new policy covering Beijing and neighbouring areas comes into force on Thursday. The countries in the scheme include most of the European Union, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan and South Korea.

The move forms part of government plans to more closely integrate the economies and development of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei.

China’s Civil Aviation Administration and the economic planning agency the National Development and Reform Commission have also pledged to construct new infrastructure to connect airports in the region by 2020.

Notices about the visa scheme have already been prepared in Chinese and English at Tianjin’s international airport as well as the city’s cruise port, the report said.

Wang Huiyao, director of the Centre for China Globalisation(CCG) think tank, said the scheme would boost the tourism sector, especially in Tianjin and Hebei.

“The new policy covers citizens from almost all the developed countries in the world and six-day stays mean foreign visitors now have enough time to travel or to attend business conferences without needing to spend time and money on visa applications,” said Wang.

Chinese tourists have become the largest contributor to the international tourism market, but China has long struggled to attract foreign travellers, with its strict visa policy often blamed as one of the factors deterring overseas tourists.

Chinese tourists made 62.03 million trips abroad in the first six months of the year, but foreigners only made 14.25 million trips to China, according to the National Tourism Administration.

 

From South China Morning Post ,2017-12-27

 

 

  • Wang Huiyao: G20 summit stresses unity and inclusiveness

    Europe needs close engagement with China on the global management of climate change and the preservation of an open trading system, while the US needs China to deal with North Korea. This multi-polar relationship puts China at the very heart of the international system, with an essential role in framing the international agenda while assuming new responsibilities.

  • US exit from Paris pact can help energy shift

    US President Donald Trump withdrew his country from the 2015 Paris climate change agreement on June 1, raising concerns across the globe. But his decision was not unexpected, because the Republican Party was opposed to the Paris climate pact from the beginning, and during his presidential campaign Trump had criticized the global agreement.

  • Global presence doesn’t make a multinational

    As Chinese companies ramp up their presence on the international stage with a string of headline-grabbing acquisitions catapulting them to global fame, some experts urge caution: Most still cannot be called true multinationals.

  • Overseas Chinese entrepreneurs urged to get involved in Belt and Road Initiative

    The Center for China and Globalization has launched a new publication Report on Development of Overseas Chinese Entrepreneurs 2017, co-authored by CCG president Wang Huiyao and Kang Rongping, director of CCG’s World Chinese Entrepreneurs Institute.

  • HK should tap bay area for development, says ex-finance chief

    Hong Kong should find ways to conduct “breakthrough” cooperation with mainland cities like Shenzhen and Zhuhai and work together to build Guangdong-Hong Kong-Macao Bay Area, said former finance chief Antony Leung Kam-chung at a round-table seminar held by think tank Center for China and Globalization (CCG) in Beijing.