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Think tank launches books on Chinese firms, migration

Monday,Jul 11, 2016

From: China.Org

Chinese think tank Center for China & Globalization, also known as CCG, hosted a book launch event on July 7 for three books about the globalization of China’s economy in recent years.

Dr. Wang Huiyao speaking about his book titled Entrepreneurship and Talent Management from a Global Perspective at the CCG. [Photo / China.org.cn]

"China Goes Global," co-written by Dr. Wang Huiyao and Dr. Miao Lu, describes how China’s outward foreign direct investments are related to the country’s enterprises. They compare China’s FDI stock to western developed countries and draw attention to Chinese reforms and government entities that have "cleared the way for Chinese companies and individuals to go global." The book contains surveys and data to progress understanding of the current state of the globalization of Chinese enterprises. The book caters to entrepreneurs, businessmen and companies attempting to go global. Readers such as Julian Chang, founding president of Chinese Globalization Association, stated that, "This timely book aptly sums up the important watershed we have just witnessed: China’s outbound direct investment has surpassed inbound direct investment and the IMF approved the Yuan’s inclusion into its basket of reserve currency."

Another book launched at the event is titled "Reverse Migration In Contemporary China," co- written by Dr. Wang Huiyao and Dr. Bao Yue. The introduction of this book brings the term "brain drain" to the readers’ awareness. This term is used to describe what takes place in a country, often underdeveloped, when large groups of educated people take their skills to more developed countries. This trend stunts the growth of underdeveloped economies. Recently, however, the book points out that migrants are returning from developed countries with new skills and knowledge and putting that into their home economy. The term used to describe this recent trend is "reverse brain drain." The authors analyze and examine how these trends have affected the Chinese economy both recently and in the more distant past.

Lastly, the third book discussed at the CCG book launching event is titled "Entrepreneurship and Talent Management from a Global Perspective," by Dr. Wang Huiyao and Dr. Liu Yipeng. This book mentions some of the same ideologies and trends discussed in the first two books. However, this book narrows in on talent being the most important factor for a competitive, fast changing global environment. In 2008 China launched the Thousand Talents Program, an effort to draw talented Chinese individuals who have gained experiences abroad to return to work for their home country. The book also enlightens readers about other similar efforts made by the Chinese government. A briefing published by the CCG states that "Entrepreneurs, managers, and policymakers will benefit from the examination of global perspectives and the different national context." (By Mariah Breeze)

From China.Org, 2016-7-7

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