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Reverse Migration in Contemporary China: Returnees, Entrepreneurship and the Chinese Economy

Wednesday,Mar 23, 2016

By: Huiyao Wang, Yue Bao

 

The authors investigate the phenomenon of high-skilled Chinese returnees and their impact on the development of the Chinese economy and society.

About the Author

Dr. Huiyao Wang is the Founder and President at the Center for China and Globalization (CCG) in Beijing, China. He has published nearly 50 books and over 100 articles on Chinese returnees, global talent and globalization issues. Dr. Wang is a counsellor of China State Council and he also sits on the Migration Advisory Board of International Organization of Migration (IOM). He was a senior fellow at Harvard Kennedy School and a visiting fellow at Brookings Institution. His main research interests include Chinese migration and diaspora, global talent as well as Chinese companies going global.

Yue Bao is a researcher at Roskilde University, Denmark. She holds an MSc in Economics from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and MA in Aesthetics from Zhejiang University, China. She has also worked with Xinhua news agency as an overseas correspondent.

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