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He Weiwen: Profit returns of fixed investment will be a problem

Thursday,Aug 18, 2016

From: CCTV NEWS

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He Weiwen, a senior fellow at Center for China & Globalization (CCG) spoke on Global Business CCTV news program, where he provided insights into China’s economy and industrial performance. He pointed out that while prospects of fixed investment do not seem optimistic, the latest industrial performance is reasonable. [VIDEO WATCHING]

From CCTV, 2016-8-12

 

 

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