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Chinese Returnees: The Right Time for Us in China

Wednesday,Mar 23, 2016

By: Wang Huiyao, Miao Lü

 

  • Overseas graduates prefer starting business in new tech

    As more Chinese overseas students choose to return home to pursue their future careers, some are deciding to be their own boss and 19.8 percent of these choose to work with new technology and the internet

  • China unveils first book series on human resource development

    China has unveiled its first book series on human resource development amid its ongoing emphasis on human resource as a key driver of national development.

  • China’s got the travel bug – but it lacks visitors

    Visitors from China may have become the biggest contributors to the global tourism market, but the Asian giant with a 5,000-year history apparently is not that attractive to foreign travellers. The number of inbound tourists grew at an average annual rate of just 1 per cent between 2005 and 2015 – and eight out of 10 of those were from Hong Kong, Macau and Taiwan, according to a report by the Centre for China and Globalisation (CCG), a Beijing think tank.

  • Chinese footwear tycoon brings jobs, economic benefits to Ethiopia

    “Chinese companies’ investment in Africa is a win-win solution for both sides. By building factories in Ethiopia, our company has created significant fiscal revenue for local authorities and offers more job opportunities for citizens. In return, we have enjoyed cheaper production costs and preferential land policies,” said Zhang Huarong, president of major Chinese footwear producer Huajian Group, at a seminar held by the Center for China & Globalization (CCG) on March 8.

  • Tougher U.S. Temporary Work Visa | CGTN

    Recently, President Trump signed a campaign with a slogan “buy American, hire American” that will favor American companies for federal contracts and the new VISA program for foreign technical workers. With this new policy, foreign workers are now in limbo after the suspension of fast track H-1B visa. Among those, Indian and Chinese workers the hardest hit under the new visa program since averagely 82% of the H-1B visa have been offered to them.