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[CGTN] Experts and entrepreneurs speak on China-US joint statement

Wednesday,May 23, 2018

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Hundreds of economists, entrepreneurs and investors were in Beijing on Sunday, May 20th for the China and Globalization Forum. Naturally, discussions turned to the latest China-US joint statement on trade and public concern about the increase in China’s imports of agricultural and energy products from the US.

Long Yongtu, Chairman of the Center for China and Globalization /CCG Photo


 

 

Long Yongtu, chairman of the Center for China and Globalization (CCG), said that China’s increase in imports is not a concession to the US, but is due to Chinese people’s growing needs and the result of mutual benefit. “Public opinion needs to be shifted. We should not equate imports with concessions. Nor should we equate exports with advantages. It’s not that simple."

Wang Huiyao, president of CCG /CCG Photo


 

Wang Huiyao, president of CCG, said both countries are taking what they want from each other. He agrees it is a good idea for China to import agriculture products from the US because of China’s large population and its large needs in agriculture imports. Besides, he says the US is strong in agriculture production both in its quantities and its efficiency.

Qian Jiannong, Fosun Global partner. /CCG Photo


 

Likewise, entrepreneurs are confident about the future of China-US trade. Qian Jiannong, a Fosun Global partner, is one of those with a positive attitude. “The cooperation and opening up of the world’s two major economies must be the future trend. In the long run, trade frictions will surely be resolved,“ says Qian.

Wang Shi, founder of Vanke Group /CCG Photo


 

 

Entrepreneurs are also thinking about the next step for China’s economy. Wang Shi, the founder of Vanke Group, is cautiously optimistic. “We are proud of what we achieved in the past. But we should be cautiously optimistic towards the future. Being cautious is to be careful about possible problems and challenges ahead of us. But there’s no reason not to be optimistic about the coming decades."

As China continues to open up, experts suggest enterprises keep striving for excellence and innovation, because it is the best way to overcome unforeseen challenges.

 

From CGTN, 2018-5-21

 

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