Home>Publications

Annual Report on the Development of Chinese Returnees (2013)

Wednesday,Feb 05, 2014

By Wang Huiyao, Mabel Miao

 

 

The Annual Report on the Development of Chinese Returnees (2013) reviews the latest developments and trends regarding Chinese returning to their home country after studying and living overseas. In so doing, it analyzes why a rising share of the overseas Chinese talent pool is deciding to return to China and the environment such individuals face back on the mainland. The book consists of five parts: General Report, Current Situation Report, Feature Report, Start-Up Park Report, and Appendix.

The General Report looks at the history and current characteristics of the global brain drain. It summarizes the recent trend of Chinese talent returning to China and introduces some reasons as to why this is happening. The Report also examines new problems and developments in China’s reverse brain drain through a survey of these returnees conducted in 2012.

Based on that survey, the Current Situation Report provides a detailed analysis of the situation of Chinese returnees in 2012. The Report is divided into two parts, one dealing with entrepreneurial returnees, the other with those opting for salaried employment. These sections cover topics ranging from returnees seeking employment, issues they encounter when setting a company, factors influencing the performance of such ventures, especially start-up firms, and the costs of benefits of studying abroad.

The Feature Report focuses on really salient issues regarding the recent circumstances of returnees. These include trends in the development of Chinese returnee talent, a comparative study of returnee scientists and their local counterparts, as well as how returnees are both spearheading social and economic change in and adapting to the society of their mother country.

The Start-Up Park Report reviews in detail three individual case studies of highly successful special talent zones or returnee start-up parks. These are the Zhongguancun Returnee Start-Up Park, Songshan Lake Hi-Tech Development Zone, and Kunshan Returnee Start-Up Park.Through an in-depth investigation of how these places develop talent and their innovative policies in this area, the Report provides useful guidance on setting similar such parks throughout China.

The Appendix offers a description of China’s latest policies on returnees and basic information on some returnee start-up parks. The Appendix also provides a list of successful returnees and returnee start-up business ventures.

 

 

  • B&R reshaping economies, trade

    “Chinese investment is fundamentally different from that coming from the West decades ago, as some Western projects were aimed at strengthening political allies,” said Huang Rihan, an expert with the Beijing-based Center for China & Globalization(CCG).

  • Laurence Brahm: Going to America

    The author (left) with Sheng Huaren who served as minister of the State Economy and Trade Commission established by Premier Zhu Rongji as a super ministry to oversee the massive state owned enterprise and industrial reforms. [Photo provided to chinadaily.com.cn]  …

  • Long Yongtu: Beijing should play bigger role in global rule making

    By pledging to abide by WTO rules, China has increased its foreign trade on average by 22 percent a year during these years, while becoming a major destination for foreign investment. China has also benefited by abiding by international rules, and it will continue to participate in making global rules, as well as executing them.

  • Zamir Ahmed Awan: Political hit for the Sino-US trade war

    The champions of globalization and advocates of trade liberalizations for over a century are now launching a trade war against China. The recent decision of President Trump’s office to impose tariffs worth over 50 billion US dollars on imports from China will have devastating effects on both sides.

  • Being labeled ‘rival’ by Trump may not be a bad thing for China

    US President Donald Trump has referred to China as a rival and pledged to end an era of economic surrender in his first State of the Union address on Wednesday (Beijing time). But a Chinese expert has said calling China a “rival” may not be totally bad for China as it is undergoing deep economic reform.